Thoughts on Summer 2016

It was a busy summer and now that we’ve reached the autumn equinox I wanted to update this blog with some of my observations over the last few months.  Although I didn’t come across any Canadian crop circle formations this year, I wonder if, perhaps, the phenomenon still occurs in pockets of this vast country but goes unreported.  This could be because there are no witnesses to the crop circle or, if there are, they simply don’t mention it or are unsure where to report it.  That’s where this site comes in – and I hope it will be a resource where anyone can learn about Canadian crop circles or even contact me if they would like more information.

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Our visit to Stonehenge, Wiltshire – a crop circle was in the field just across the highway from here.

In July, my husband, Greg, and I travelled to England.  It had been seven years since I was last in Wiltshire and, while I was only in the countryside less than a week (I also visited family in London), I gave a lecture about Canadian crop circles, listened to several other fascinating talks, met some old friends from my past crop circle travels, and made some new friends too.  I was also fortunate to visit a few crop circles and came home with some interesting insights.

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The ‘Pyramids’ crop circle at Hackpen Hill

One of the crop circles we visited was at Hackpen Hill.  Although it had seen many visitors, the shape was still fascinating.  Just above it was the ‘Sharks’ formation at the Ridgeway.  This one had also been there a number of weeks but one could still make out curious ‘swept up’ stalks which gave it a neat ‘shading’ when viewed from above.  Perhaps most interesting was that I found visible plant changes in many of the stalks.  These nodal abnormalities (either stretched, elongated or expulsion cavities) were found in all the circles I saw during my visit.  I tried to take  measurements and, while this certainly wouldn’t qualify as a scientific report, there were statistical differences.  I realize there is much debate about this subject, but to me, these nodal changes cannot be manmade.  Below are some of the close up photos I took of nodes from these crop circles – apologies that my photography isn’t very good (except for the first one – that was taken by my cousin who had a much better camera!).

After England, Greg and I used our air mile points to visit family and friends in various cities across Canada.  On the way back, we stayed a few days in Saskatchewan and drove around the southern part of the province.  I love the vast, open prairie fields and we also passed through many towns were Canadian crop circles have been reported in years passed.  The interesting thing about many Canadian crop fields is that there are usually no tramlines – so if a new crop circle is spotted from the air, there are no entry pathways.  In the past, many have been discovered during harvest time and, this may still be happening, although I can understand the many reasons why farmers are reluctant to publicize that they have come across an unusual geometric formation in the middle of their field.  While many, including the media, often dismiss them as ‘all hoaxes’, I think that if one keeps an open, curious mind to the subject of crop circles, there is much to be learned from this phenomena – about our world, and about ourselves. And I read once that each of us, through this human existence we have, are constantly called to learn, experience, evolve.  Crop circles remind – and challenge us – to do just that.

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Abandoned but nonetheless intriguing buildings dot the vast prairies of southern Saskatchewan

I’d also like to share an article which I feel is important – please read Crop Circles…a Sociological Propostition– I found it hit the nail on the head, so to speak, when it comes to how crop circles are perceived today, how society often reacts to them – and how we can change that.  For my part, over the coming months, I hope to include information from past Canadian crop circles, courtesy of the former Canadian Crop Circle Research Network (CCCRN) website.  Again, I believe this is important information which should be available to all.  And as always, feel free to contact me if you have any questions.